RE: [asa] finally convinced

From: Kenneth Piers <pier@calvin.edu>
Date: Sat Dec 12 2009 - 11:05:20 EST

Friends: I don't think that there is any way to truly convince the climate skeptics that we ought to begin sooner rather than later in reducing carbon emissions to the atmosphere by moving toward a non-carbon energy system - moves that will be necessitated in any event due to the non-renewable nature of fossil fuels. In the meantime while the world's nations dither, the mountain glaciers continue to melt (the Himalaya glaciers serve 2-3 billion people with fresh water, the tropical Andean glaciers are in severe melt-back), the Arctic ice cap may soon disappear altogether in the summer and a host of other climate-change indicators continue to strengthen. None of these changes can be explained in terms of "natural cycles", but all of them become comprehensible, if not fully predictable, by taking into account human impacts on the global ecosystem; 2009, a relatively cool year by comparison with some others, will likely turn out to be the fifth warmest year since temperature re!
 cords began to be kept, even though the weather was impacted by a La Nina event (now disappearing in favor of an El Nino cycle) and the the sun is at a low ebb in its approximately 11-year sunspot cycle.
The so-called "climategate" is nothing more than a tempest in a teapot, which does not change the state of AGW in the smallest iota; it was an illegal and cynical act meant to distract policy makers at Copenhagen from the real business of addressing a changing climate.
Two books that I would recommend as sane and comprehensible reads on the climate-change issue are:
1. David Archer (U. of Chicago): Global Warming: Understanding the Forecast (Blackwell, 2007).
2. Frank Ackerman (Tufts U): Can We Afford the Future? The Economics of a Warming World (Zed Books, 2009)
Ken Piers

Ken Piers

"We are by nature creatures of faith, as perhaps all creatures are; we live by counting on things that cannot be proved. As creatures of faith, we must choose either to be religious or superstitious, to believe in things that cannot be proved or to believe in things that can be disproved."
Wendell Berry

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Received on Sat Dec 12 11:05:53 2009

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