Re: [asa] Technology not Targets, TIME Copehagan update...

From: John Burgeson (ASA member) <hossradbourne@gmail.com>
Date: Fri Dec 11 2009 - 10:02:15 EST

What TIME confuses is the difference between the goal and the means to
achieve it.

The damage has already been done, and our great grandchildren will
curse us for not acting sooner. We have some hope of not causing
global catastrophe. I am not optimistic, even if the Copenhaagan
proceedings "succeed."

The RR has chosen to make this a political matter. History books of
2150 (if they are still being written) will wonder at this.

It is sort of like evolution. The creationistss don't seem to grasp
"deep time." The denialists don't seem to grasp the incredible
fragility of human civilization on planet earth. And so many people
get their marching orders from Faux News!

On 12/10/09, John Walley <john_walley@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>
> I think this is very reasonable.
>
> John
>
>
>
> ----- Forwarded Message ----
>
>
>
> Investments in clean energy technology, not targets and timetables for
> reducing carbon emissions, should be at the heart of the negotiations in
> Copenhagen, according to TIME.
>
> In an excellent new article titled "Copenhagen's Real Challenge: Technology
> to Meet the Targets," Bryan Walsh writes that for all the talk of targets
> and timetables for reducing carbon emissions, scant attention is paid to the
> scale of clean technology investments that will be necessary to put the
> world economy on a low-carbon path and stabilize the climate.
>
> Walsh quotes a recent article by Breakthrough Institute's Jesse Jenkins and
> myself that makes a similar argument:
>
> "Without measurable progress that dramatically increases global investments
> in clean energy, we can forget stabilizing global temperatures or
> atmospheric carbon dioxide at any level"
>
> Indeed, enabling the large-scale and rapid deployment of clean energy
> technologies will require large investments in clean energy research and
> development (R&D) to dramatically reduce their costs.
>
> Today, the world lacks ready-to-deploy, scalable low-carbon technologies
> according to Breakthrough Institute Senior Fellow Chris Green and co-author
> Isabelle Galiana in a recent commentary in Nature, also cited in the TIME
> article.  Green and Galiana write that a major global investment in energy
> R&D will be necessary to bring about a truly carbon-free world.
>
> The biggest advantage of a technology-centered policy, according to TIME, is
> that it's also a political winner, and is not limited by intractable
> political conflicts over emissions rights.  "Carbon caps are politically
> controversial because they implicitly acknowledge that the world has limits,
> and that countries will have to fight for their individual share."
>
> Investment in clean technology, by contrast, has broad political support.
> "Investing in R&D to make clean energy cheap is the most popular energy
> proposal there is," says Breakthrough's Michael Shellenberger in the TIME
> article.
>
> Ultimately, writes Walsh, "That may be a global deal everyone can embrace."
>
> .
>
>
> Happy Holidays,
>
> Devon Swezey
> Project Director
> Breakthrough Institute
>
>
>
> The Breakthrough Institute | 436 14th St., Suite 820 | Oakland | CA | 94612
>
>
>

-- 
Burgy
www.burgy.50megs.com
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Received on Fri Dec 11 10:02:38 2009

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