Re: [asa] ID/Miracles/Design (more info)

From: Iain Strachan <igd.strachan@gmail.com>
Date: Fri May 01 2009 - 13:19:58 EDT

You're all wrong.
Of course it was nothing more than a coincidence. After all any set of
numbers is as likely as any other ;-)

(Apologies to Dick Fischer for reproducing his favourite argument).

Iain

On Fri, May 1, 2009 at 5:36 PM, Michael Roberts <
michael.andrea.r@ukonline.co.uk> wrote:

> Is that a more organic answer?
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> *From:* George Murphy <GMURPHY10@neo.rr.com>
> *To:* Dehler, Bernie <bernie.dehler@intel.com>
> *Cc:* asa <asa@calvin.edu>
> *Sent:* Friday, May 01, 2009 5:19 PM
> *Subject:* Re: [asa] ID/Miracles/Design (more info)
>
> Or a Daniel Pinkham thing.
>
> Shalom
> George
> http://home.roadrunner.com/~scitheologyglm
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> *From:* Dehler, Bernie <bernie.dehler@intel.com>
> *Cc:* asa <asa@calvin.edu>
> *Sent:* Friday, May 01, 2009 11:55 AM
> *Subject:* RE: [asa] ID/Miracles/Design (more info)
>
> “On a whim, the organist dialed the set of digits into his telephone, and
> to his great delight, when the phone was picked up, he was greeted with
> "Daniel Pinkham speaking".”
>
>
>
> Was that a trick of Satan, or a God-thing? ;-)
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> *From:* asa-owner@lists.calvin.edu [mailto:asa-owner@lists.calvin.edu] *On
> Behalf Of *Iain Strachan
> *Sent:* Friday, May 01, 2009 12:43 AM
> *To:* Murray Hogg
> *Cc:* asa
> *Subject:* Re: [asa] ID/Miracles/Design (more info)
>
>
>
> I once read of an amusing example of "information placing" in music. I'm
> sure Bernie will appreciate this, believing as he does that all music
> evolves rather than being designed.
>
> An organist was playing a toccata by the (then) living composer Daniel
> Pinkham. He noticed a curious passage where there were a set of sequences
> of repeated notes, of differing lengths. These were clearly an evolutionary
> process - just duplicate a set of repeated notes (gene duplication) and then
> either add or subtract one or more notes (mutation). So they could be said
> to correspond to a set of digits. On a whim, the organist dialed the set of
> digits into his telephone, and to his great delight, when the phone was
> picked up, he was greeted with "Daniel Pinkham speaking".
>
> .. ._ .. _.
>
> Ps. Intriguing: The first three letters of my name in alphabet characters
> is a palindrome, and the last three letters of the name in Morse code are
> also a palindrome. That MUST be deliberate design!
>
> Iain .. .._ .. _.
>
> On Fri, May 1, 2009 at 12:34 AM, Murray Hogg <muzhogg@netspace.net.au>
> wrote:
>
>
>
> Dehler, Bernie wrote:
>
> I think your explanation is a case of mixed metaphors. Books and binary
> coded information are two different analogies- neither are related to each
> other.
>
>
> Hi Bernie,
>
> Well, of course there's no NECESSARY connection between books and binary
> coded information, but the point is that such a connection can easily be
> artificially created.
> All that's required to encode binary data is a system capable of
> representing two distinct states: a stack of books (upright/ inverted) WILL
> do the job. But so too a row of ducks (facing left/facing right), chess
> pawns (black/white), cars (hard-top/convertible) and so on.
> More conventionally, of course, we use things such as pulse widths
> (long/short) or voltage levels (high/low) but there's no reason why
> something less practical and more bizarre (like books, ducks, chess-pawns,
> cars, whatever) can't be used.
>
> Indeed, if you wanted to encode a SECRET message ("Ze Bosch general
> pig-swine is arrive pour le train at midnight"), the more unusual the medium
> the better - it ensures that the unaware can't identify, hence read, the
> encoded message. Should the police ever have reason to investigate a person,
> the FIRST place they will look for binary encoded data is on a computer
> hard-drive - a row of subtly arranged books on a bookshelf is unlikely to
> garner their attention.
> The important point here is the trivial fact that there are no physical
> systems which are "related" to binary encoded data except by convention. The
> only reason people think that there's a connection between voltage states
> and binary data in digital electronics, for instance, is because they are so
> used to what is in reality a quite ARBITRARY convention. There's no
> intrinsic relation to a voltage level of 5 volts and binary "1". Indeed, we
> might have selected ANY voltage level. Or we might have decided that 5 volts
> means "off" (as it does in negative logic) or it might have no binary
> significance whatsoever - as in the case of an analog circuit.
>
> So, I respond to your claim that there is no relation between books and
> binary coded data with the simple rider "unless somebody cares to establish
> one."
> If, then, I tell you that I've laid out a binary coded message using copies
> of a book where an upright book = 1, and an upside down book = 0, then it's
> pretty clear that a relationship between books and binary coded data HAS
> been created, and that the series;
>
> upright book, upright book, upside down book, upright book
> encodes for binary 1101.
>
> Blessings,
> Murray
>
>
>
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>
>
>
>
> --
> -----------
> Non timeo sed caveo
> (\__/)
> (='.'=)
> (")_(") This is a bunny copy him into your signature so he can gain world
> domination
> -----------
>
>

-- 
-----------
Non timeo sed caveo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(") This is a bunny copy him into your signature so he can gain world
domination
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Received on Fri May 1 13:20:41 2009

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