Re: [asa] Appeasing TE?

From: Michael Roberts <michael.andrea.r@ukonline.co.uk>
Date: Sat Dec 20 2008 - 14:16:34 EST

My picture from tides was that I live on the coast and yesterday I went to a farm on the sea-edge. Twice a day the road there is flooded at high tide and then one has to drive along a sea wall/embankment. the farmer has sheep on the shore as he sells salt lamb and the flock have to go to high ground every high tide. Either the farmer accepts the tides or else he would go spare trying to keep the tide out.

Michael
  ----- Original Message -----
  From: Nucacids
  To: asa@calvin.edu
  Sent: Saturday, December 20, 2008 1:18 AM
  Subject: Re: [asa] Appeasing TE?

  Hi Michael,

   

  "Boomeranging from one fundamentalism into another? A good point. The fact is that both build up a brick wall of absolute certainty around themselves. One crack and it has gone."

   

  Indeed. I think you have your finger on a key point when it comes to certainty - the need to know. And I think that need for certainty is born of a need to control. Certainty is a way our minds seek to control our environment, making sure all the facts fit into their proper place. A fundamentalist mindset needs to control his/her surroundings to the greatest extent possible. This is why secular fundamentalists treat Science the way the religious fundamentalists treat their Holy Books.

   

  "There are various causes and I would put an extreme form of inerrancy near the top, as once we can admit that the Gospel narratives don't quite agree we have either to go for Lindsell's six denials of Jesus or dismiss the Gospels and the rest of the bible as totally errant."

   

  You may be right, although I'm not sure it's a cause or an effect (I'd have to think on that). But either way, there is an all-or-none, black-and-white perspective that is shared by both religious and secular fundamentalists.

   

   "Conversely the so-called TE views seem weak as they have no brick walls and the tide goes in and out, which to some seems fatal."

   

  Good point. If you need to control everything around you, then no brick walls between you and the tide can be a terrifying thing to comprehend. Letting go and reaching out in faith are the very acts that control freaks, by definition, cannot do.

   

  I myself have always had a high tolerance for ambiguity (a concept psychologists have studied for years - google it). This may explain why I went through a fundamentalist phase long ago and emerged from it without losing my faith.

   

  I wonder if someone has ever tested YECs, TEs, and Atheists for ambiguity tolerance.

   

  - Mike

    Boomeranging from one fundamentalism into another? A good point. The fact is that both build up a brick wall of absolute certainty around themselves. One crack and it has gone.

    There are various causes and I would put an extreme form of inerrancy near the top, as once we can admit that the Gospel narratives don't quite agree we have either to go for Lindsell's six denials of Jesus or dismiss the Gospels and the rest of the bible as totally errant.

    Thus in a case like Bernie we may wonder that if you persuade someone that the earth is a trifle older than 6012 years then their whole edifice of faith will collapse.

    Conversely the so-called TE views seem weak as they have no brick walls and the tide goes in and out, which to some seems fatal.

    A YEC position has to be fought tooth and nail as there is perceived to be no stopping place before atheism

    Michael

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Received on Sat Dec 20 14:17:29 2008

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