RE: [asa] Four views

From: Alexanian, Moorad <alexanian@uncw.edu>
Date: Tue Dec 16 2008 - 12:16:20 EST

In the order of things, it seems to me that the great intellectual divide is whether one believes in a Creator or not. Afterwards, there may be a no man's land of opinions a bit like the string theory landscape or anthropic landscape, which refers to the large number of possible false vacua in string theory.

 

One needs to assume a worldview that is most consistent with all the data. However, what data? The data must include not only purely physical, objective data but also subjective data whereby the human being is the "detector" of nonphysical data.

 

Now, does not believing in a Creator make you an atheist? Maybe not. If you believe in a Creator, how does that Creator interact with the whole of reality? Here, one again must find the theory that fits all the data best including unique historical data that cannot be generalized into laws and thus do not form part, because it cannot, of scientific theories.

 

There is a mystery that all our intellectual exchanges is not going to add one iota to its comprehension, thereby why faith must be an integral part of any serious, intellectual pursuit, viz. faith in the correctness of your assumed worldview.

 

Whatever we do, let it not be said of us, "Professing to be wise, they became fools." Rom. 1:22.

 

Moorad

________________________________

From: asa-owner@lists.calvin.edu on behalf of Randy Isaac
Sent: Tue 12/16/2008 11:12 AM
To: asa@calvin.edu
Subject: [asa] Four views

Perhaps one might summarize some of the various metaphysical viewpoints like this:
 
atheistic evolutionism: Human beings are the unintended, accidental result of random processes. How do we know this? Because we have examined the details of the intermediate processes from the Big Bang to human existence and find that they are characterized by random events which could have been otherwise. Pure chance.
 
ID: Human beings are the intended, purposeful result of an intelligent agent. How do we know this? Because we have examined the details of the intermediate processes from the Big Bang to human existence and find that they are characterized by random events which would most likely have been otherwise but were in fact precisely that required for human existence. Specified complexity.
 
TE: Human beings are the intended, purposeful result of God's creative act. How do we know this? Because God has revealed it to us in his Word. We may or may not find direct evidence of it, or the mechanism for it, in the details of the intermediate evolutionary processes but even if we did, the basis of knowledge is God's revelation. Revealed knowledge.
 
Process theology: Human beings are the unintended, accidental result of random processes, endowed with the Imago Dei by God. How do we know this? Because we have examined the details of the intermediate processes from the Big Bang to human existence and find that they are characterized by random events which could have been otherwise. God has revealed to us that he chose our species, which had evolved to a state of consciousness and God-awareness with the ability to perceive and communicate with God, to be the focus of the incarnation.
 
 
Randy

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Received on Tue Dec 16 12:16:25 2008

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