Re: [asa] Nanotechnology & Religion

From: John Walley <john_walley@yahoo.com>
Date: Mon Dec 08 2008 - 17:57:58 EST

Besides this reductionist attempt to recreate life, I noticed on the IBSS site the other day (see below) a very intriguing page on several reviews of neuropsychology books and articles on experiments that appear to be a reductionist attempt at redefining God. They basically manipulate various parts of the brain with EMF and claim to induce religous type experiments implying that God is the result of a genetic cause that leaves some people sensitive to this phenomenon and that it is of a purely naturalistic origin.

Further, what is also if great interest to me is that Dr. Stephen Meyers doesn't appear to take much issue with the ability of science to mimic spiritual occurences which pretty much implies that God may have used natural processes even for what we have always considered to be special divine visitations or interventions. This is not to say that the answer to prayer or a special feeling of the presence of God isn't also divine but it is a curious thought to consider that it doesn't need to be.

Anyway, George's response to this about life below made me think of the parallel with this article and whether our response should be the same? I am curious if other have given this any thought and what would we say if a God Gene or Genes was one day identified and the experiential knowledge we have of God through our faith could one day be manipulated and recreated in humans at will?

That strikes me as making the TE/Special Creation debate pale in comparison.

Thanks

John

http://www.bibleandscience.com/counseling/godpartbrain.htm

--- On Mon, 12/8/08, George Murphy <GMURPHY10@neo.rr.com> wrote:

> From: George Murphy <GMURPHY10@neo.rr.com>
> Subject: Re: [asa] Nanotechnology & Religion
> To: "Christine Smith" <christine_mb_smith@yahoo.com>, asa@calvin.edu
> Date: Monday, December 8, 2008, 1:21 PM
> There are of course ethical issues that would arise if
> nanotechnologies did make it possible to develop living
> systems artificially. But there is no sound theological
> basis for the idea that this would conflict with belief in
> divine creation. That idea is what I referred to recently
> here as the Joyce Kilmer ("Only God can make a
> tree") school of thought about divine action.
> Certainly there is a sense in which only God can create
> anything but there's nothing in scripture that suggests
> that God's creation of living things is unmediated,
> & if it is mediated via natural processes then those
> processes can in principle be replicated by human
> technology.
>
> Shalom
> George
> http://home.neo.rr.com/scitheologyglm
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Christine Smith"
> <christine_mb_smith@yahoo.com>
> To: <asa@calvin.edu>
> Sent: Monday, December 08, 2008 9:30 AM
> Subject: [asa] Nanotechnology & Religion
>
>
> > Hi all,
> >
> > FYI - A BBC story on a study about religion &
> nanotechnology:
> http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7767192.stm.
> >
> > Of particular note is this little excerpt:
> > "The researchers say it is understandable that
> there would be a conflict between religious belief and
> nanotechnology, especially when looking at what they call
> "nano-bio-info-cogno" (NBIC) technologies, the
> potential to create life at a nano scale without divine
> intervention."
> >
> > Sounds like we all could have some fun
> debating/debunking that notion...
> >
> > In Christ,
> > Christine (ASA member)
> >
> > "For we walk by faith, not by sight" ~II
> Corinthians 5:7
> >
> > Help save the life of a homeless animal--visit
> www.azrescue.org to find out how.
> >
> > Recycling a single aluminum can conserves enough
> energy to power your TV for 3 hours--Reduce, Reuse, Recycle!
> Learn more at www.cleanup.org
> >
> > To unsubscribe, send a message to majordomo@calvin.edu
> with
> > "unsubscribe asa" (no quotes) as the body of
> the message.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >

      

To unsubscribe, send a message to majordomo@calvin.edu with
"unsubscribe asa" (no quotes) as the body of the message.
Received on Mon Dec 8 17:58:09 2008

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.1.8 : Mon Dec 08 2008 - 17:58:10 EST