Re: [asa] (fall) biological evolution and a literal Adam- logically inconsistent?

From: George Cooper <georgecooper@sbcglobal.net>
Date: Sat Sep 06 2008 - 23:29:24 EDT

 understooddeath to mean something like the opposite of living, which he was now experiencing. I am curious of everyone's opinion ofwhether or not pre-Adamaites would, essentially, eliminateinconsistencybetween evolution and a literal Adam? "Coope" -----Original Message----- From: asa-owner@lists.calvin.edu [mailto:asa-owner@lists.calvin.edu] On Behalf Of gordon brown Sent: Friday, September 05, 2008 11:22 AM To: asa@calvin.edu Subject: Re: [asa] (fall) biological evolution and a literal Adam- logically inconsistent? Bethany, The "no sickness, no tears, no pain, no death" that conflicts with science is an interpretation of Genesis, not what it actually says. In fact, one might ask how Adam was supposed to understand what it meant to die the day he ate from the tree if he hadn't seen something that was dead. The Garden required watering and a human gardener. The really unusual thing in the Garden was the tree of life. It isn't until near the end of Chapter 3 that we get even a clue as to what it was for. I think that that is where the question of literal interpretation and agreement or disagreement with science is most readily raised. Revelation builds on themes from the Old Testament. Just as Genesis almost from the beginning introduces the Garden of Eden, Revelation almost at the end describes a new Garden of Eden. However it is far more than a recycling. In the new Garden or city there is no sun, no moon, and no night. This is seen as being much better than the old Garden. Gordon Brown (ASA member) On Fri, 5 Sep 2008, Bethany Sollereder wrote: > Gordon, > > Actually, if you look in the LXX, Gen 2:8 uses the word paradise (* > paradeison*) to describe the garden of Eden.  But the word just means an > idyllic place or state - in fact when I just looked it up, paradise was > defined as "the abode of Adam and Eve before the Fall in the biblical > account of the creation: the Garden of Eden".  It was a place where the > forces of chaos had been dealt with by the acts of creation.  Humans had a > task, but it was one they were well able to do. They were in need of nothing > - there was no sickness, no tears, no pain, no death.  And to top it all > off, God walked in the garden with them. > In fact, take a look at the late chapters of Revelations and we see a > recycling of many of the same things, only it is a garden-city in Rev, not > just a garden. > > Hope this helps. > > Bethany > To unsubscribe, send a message to majordomo@calvin.edu with "unsubscribe asa" (no quotes) as the body of the message.

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Received on Sat Sep 6 23:30:12 2008

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