Re: [asa] Tablet ignites debate on messiah and resurrection

From: Christine Smith <christine_mb_smith@yahoo.com>
Date: Tue Jul 08 2008 - 17:32:03 EDT

Hi George,

Thanks for the clarification (and correction!--I never
was very good with foreign languages) :) That was the
word I was remembering. Just out of curiosity, what
would be the Hebrew equivalent of the Greek word?

In Christ,
Christine (ASA member)

--- George Murphy <GMURPHY10@neo.rr.com> wrote:

> Without hunting through Wright's book (which doesn't
> include this word in its primarily Engligh index)
> I'm guessing that the word Christine has in mind is
> either the Greek verb ani'stemi (long e), meaning to
> raise, or the related noun ana'stasis, rising.
> Neither is used exclusively of the resurrection of
> the dead, though they are commonly used of the
> resurrection of Christ both in the NT & later
> Christian writing. (This is the root of my older
> daughter's name, Anastasia.) These are Greek words
> & the inscription is in Hebrew.
>
> On the question of relevance to the NT: One thing
> that has been a puzzle is the question of what
> specific OT text the early tradition quoted by Paul
> in I Cor.15:3-7 is referring to when it says that
> Christ "was raised [egegertai - note use of a
> different word] according to the scriptures." What
> OT scripture says that the Messiah - or anyone for
> that matter - will be raised from the dead on the
> third day? The best guess has been Hos.6:2, "After
> two days he will revive us; on the third day he will
> raise us up, that we may live before him." That's a
> stretch if just read on its own but we have to take
> into account the possibility that the early
> Christians, believing that Jesus had been raised on
> the 3d day, simply looked for a text that they
> thought said that. OTOH it's not easy to get fully
> into the minds of 1st century Palestinian Jews & its
> possible that they - & not just Jewish Christians -
> understood some text that seems to us of little
> relevance to speak of resurrection even before
> Easter. If that's the case then the inscription
> under discussion & the "according to the scriptures"
> of the primitive Christian confession would simply
> be expressions of common Jewish interpretation of
> the time. (Pinchas Lapide, The Resurrection of
> Jesus: A Jewish Perspective [Augsburg, 1983] is
> worth looking at in this connection.)
>
> Shalom
> George
> http://web.raex.com/~gmurphy/
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Christine Smith"
> <christine_mb_smith@yahoo.com>
> To: <asa@calvin.edu>
> Sent: Tuesday, July 08, 2008 12:05 PM
> Subject: Re: [asa] Tablet ignites debate on messiah
> and resurrection
>
>
> > Thanks to David O. for posting the (suggested)
> > translation...a quick question and comment...see
> > below...
> >
> > In Christ,
> > Christine (ASA member)
> >
> > --- Rich Blinne <rich.blinne@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> >> On Tue, Jul 8, 2008 at 7:56 AM, David Opderbeck
> >> <dopderbeck@gmail.com>
> >> wrote:
> >>
> >> > Biblical Archeology Review published a
> >> transcription of the tablet back in
> >> > January
> >> (http://bib-arch.org/news/dss-in-stone-news.asp).
>
> >> Some folks on
> >> > the "biblical-studies" listserv pointed me to
> the
> >> following lines as the
> >> > ones possibly referring to a messiah who dies
> and
> >> rises in three days (lines
> >> > 19-21 and 80 -- context for line 80 given
> here):
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > 19. sanctity(?)\sanctify(?) Israel! In three
> days
> >> you shall know,* *that(?)\for(?)
> >> > He said,
> >> >
> >> > 20. (namely,) yhwh the Lord of Hosts, the Lord
> of
> >> Israel: The evil broke
> >> > (down)
> >> >
> >> > 21. before justice. Ask me and I will tell you
> >> what 22this bad 21plant is,
> >> >
> >> > and
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > 75. Three shepherds went out to?/of? Israel
> .[.].
> >> >
> >> > 76. If there is a priest, if there are sons of
> >> saints .[.]
> >> >
> >> > 77. Who am I(?), I (am?) Gabri'el the
> .(=angel?).
> >> [.]
> >> >
> >> > 78. You(?) will save them, .[.].
> >> >
> >> > 79. from before You, the three si[gn]s(?),
> three
> >> .[..]
> >> >
> >> > 80. In three days ., I, Gabri'el .[?],
> >> >
> >> > 81. the Prince of Princes, ., narrow holes(?)
> >> .[.].
> >> >
> >> > 82. to/for . [.]. and the .
> >> >
> >> > So.... ok, I have zero expertise in
> interpreting
> >> this sort of artifact, but
> >> > --- doesn't it seem a wee bit of a stretch to
> >> claim this definitely refers
> >> > to a tradition of a messiah who will die and
> rise
> >> again in three days?
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >> There's a newer claim on what line 80 is saying.
> The
> >> NYT reports it this
> >> way:
> >>
> >> The slaying of Simon, or any case of the
> suffering
> >> messiah, is seen as a
> >> > necessary step toward national salvation, he
> says,
> >> pointing to lines 19
> >> > through 21 of the tablet - "In three days you
> will
> >> know that evil will be
> >> > defeated by justice" - and other lines that
> speak
> >> of blood and slaughter as
> >> > pathways to justice.
> >> >
> >> > To make his case about the importance of the
> >> stone, Mr. Knohl focuses
> >> > especially on line 80, which begins clearly
> with
> >> the words "L'shloshet
> >> > yamin," meaning "in three days." The next word
> of
> >> the line was deemed
> >> > partially illegible by Ms. Yardeni and Mr.
> >> Elitzur, but Mr. Knohl, who is an
> >> > expert on the language of the Bible and Talmud,
> >> says the word is "hayeh," or
> >> > "live" in the imperative. It has an unusual
> >> spelling, but it is one in
> >> > keeping with the era.
> >
> > Unfortunately, a friend in another state borrowed
> my
> > copy of The Resurrection of the Son of God by N.
> T.
> > Wright, but as I recall, when speaking of
> > resurrection, there is a very particular word (and
> > derivatives thereof) which is used in the
> > Bible...something starting with "a" or "n" I
> > think--translates to "arise" I think...in any
> case, I
> > don't think that's the word being referenced here.
> So
> > I question (from a very ameteur point of view!)
> > whether this version of "live" (if indeed it's
> right)
> > is really referring to resurrection of the dead in
> a
> > strict theological sense, or if its a more general
> > term applicable to something else?
> >
> >
> >> >
> >> > Two more hard-to-read words come later, and Mr.
> >> Knohl said he believed that
> >> > he had deciphered them as well, so that the
> line
> >> reads, *"In three days
> >> > you shall live, I, Gabriel, command you."*
> >
> > Even if this is speaking of resurrection here, it
> is
> > different from that which is presented in the NT.
> In
> > the NT, although (in some accounts) there were
> angels
>
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Received on Tue Jul 8 17:33:00 2008

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