Re: [asa] Question on molecular biology and Darwinism

From: gordon brown <Gordon.Brown@Colorado.EDU>
Date: Wed Jul 02 2008 - 21:27:00 EDT

On Wed, 2 Jul 2008, PvM wrote:

> Why would it suggest that someone designed it?
>
> On Wed, Jul 2, 2008 at 3:09 PM, gordon brown <Gordon.Brown@colorado.edu> wrote:
>> On Wed, 2 Jul 2008, Collin Brendemuehl wrote:
>>
>>> Yet from a molecular biologist (doppleganger, a PhD in the field) I learn
>>> that
>>>
>>> "a single point mutation in one gene altered ALL of those things in the
>>> limbs and head of the individual. You do NOT, in fact, need specific
>>> mutations to alter every part of a limb. That is just naive folk science."
>>>
>>> It would appear that gene changes might often be significant, and not as
>>> the evolutionary models might indicate.
>>>
>>
>> This is certainly not my field, but if this is true, wouldn't it suggest
>> that someone might have designed it? Of course such an argument would not be
>> used by many advocates of design because it really doesn't fit their agenda.

Pim,

Whether or not a certain discovery will suggest design depends at least in
part on what you think an undesigned world should look like and why. I
personally have no idea what it should look like.

In the past there have been unexpected discoveries that didn't fit what
some people who didn't believe in design thought that an undesigned world
should look like, and this proved disconcerting to them. Some of them were
able to continue to disbelieve in design by revising their expectations of
an undesigned world. For example, natural selection gave a direction to
the development of life, and multiverses might make our universe not look
so improbable.

It wouldn't seem too surprising if some people would be awed by seeing a
host of positive changes caused by one small change and be prompted to
raise basic philosophical questions.

Gordon Brown (ASA member)

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Received on Wed Jul 2 21:28:03 2008

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