Re: [asa] (fruit flies???) A Message from the RTB Scholar Team

From: Dennis Venema <Dennis.Venema@twu.ca>
Date: Tue Apr 22 2008 - 12:57:01 EDT

Hi Bernie,

most evolutionary biologists donıt think that so-called ³macroevolution² -
mutations that have sudden, large-scale effects ­ plays much of a role in
evolution. These, while dramatic and underscoring the importance of the
affected genes in development, likely produce changes too far outside the
range of normal to provide a benefit.

in terms of artificial selection leading to rapid, large-scale morphological
changes, look no farther than the dog in your house (descended from a timber
wolf) or the various forms of wild mustard on your plate. Anyone who doubts
the ability for mutation and selection to produce large-scale changes in a
short amount of time should have a serious look at a Chihuahua. Then
consider the time scale of this transition in terms of geology ­ when
compared with timber wolves it would appear instantaneously in the fossil
record.

Mustard evolution under natural selection:

http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evosite/evo101/IIIE4Evochange.shtml

Dennis

On 4/22/08 9:40 AM, "Dehler, Bernie" <bernie.dehler@intel.com> wrote:

> Hi Keith-
>
> Sounds like you are referring to what YECıs call ³micro evolution.² I think
> if we really understood evolution, we should be able to do ³macro evolution²
> also in the labŠ such as creating new creatures; since we can do the same
> thing nature does, only much faster when directed by intelligence (we can
> measure, screen, and control populations of animals that reproduce rather
> rapidly).
>
>
>
> From: asa-owner@lists.calvin.edu [mailto:asa-owner@lists.calvin.edu] On Behalf
> Of Keith Miller
> Sent: Monday, April 21, 2008 5:40 PM
> To: AmericanScientificAffiliation Affiliation
> Subject: Re: [asa] (fruit flies???) A Message from the RTB Scholar Team
>
>
> Bernie wrote:
>
>
>>
>> I believe that evolution happened but hereıs my stumbling block. Since
>> nature does evolution with mutation (chance) and natural selection, we should
>> be able to considerably ³speed things up² by applying intelligence in a lab
>> situation.
>
>
> We do speed it up, its called artificial selection. New species have been
> generated by artificial selection. The rapidity with which artificial
> selection has generated the diversity of domesticated animals and plants has
> demonstrated how quickly selection plus mutation-generated genetic change can
> generate observable phenotypic effects.
>
>
>
> Again, there is no debate about the reality of speciation. Even young Earth
> creationists do not deny it -- although it is often dismissed as only
> variation within a completely undefined (and undefinable) "kind."
>
>
>
> Keith
>
>
>
>
> Keith B. Miller
>
> Research Assistant Professor
>
> Dept of Geology, Kansas State University
>
> Manhattan, KS 66506-3201
>
> 785-532-2250
>
> http://www-personal.ksu.edu/~kbmill/
>
>
>

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Received on Tue Apr 22 12:57:52 2008

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