Re: [asa] Question on recent OBE study, NDE

From: Christine Smith <christine_mb_smith@yahoo.com>
Date: Fri Aug 24 2007 - 13:05:28 EDT

See my responses below...

--- David Campbell <pleuronaia@gmail.com> wrote:

> > However, in a near-death experience (NDE),
> especially
> > those when a person has been declared clinically
> dead
> > (which as I understand it, means there's no brain
> > activity), am I correct in thinking that the
> findings
> > of this recent OBE study would not be applicable,
> > because the brain is not receiving and/or
> processing
> > sensory information (i.e. the person's eyes are
> > closed, there's no activity in regions of the
> brain
> > that would normally process such information)?
>
> I don't know how many of the stories are actually
> accompanied by solid
> evidence of lacking brain activity. The two
> examples I know of
> personally involved the emergency room personnel not
> anticipating
> survival, but no mention of specific assessment of
> brain activity. If
> the brain is not receiving normal stimuli, it can
> start to mistake
> other things for real sensory input. Of course,
> that doesn't explain
> why a particular set of coherent impressions would
> result, but it does
> suggest that there may be similar physical processes
> going on (even if
> the causative agent were a spiritual experience,
> presumably there must
> be some way of transmitting that into the neurons of
> the brain).
>
Aside from anecdotal stories (some of which, if true,
would be hard to explain scientifically I think), I
have found one study on-line that specified that the
patients were in a clinically dead state:
http://sedna.no.sapo.pt/death_scresearch/pdf_docs/sdm_nde.pdf,
with a rebuttal to skeptic Michael Shermer here:
http://www.skepticalinvestigations.org/whoswho/vanLommel.htm
(I couldn't find Shermer's critique on-line) I would
imagine there are probably others out there as well?

>
> My father's purported near-death experience might be
> of interest. No
> bright lights or voices, though. When he was
> hospitalized to drain
> excess pericardial fluid, a nurse saw the monitor go
> to a flat line
> and rushed in to find him sitting up and combing his
> hair. The flat
> line was merely due to a loose clip on the monitor
> wire, but I was
> able to point out that combing showed he had been
> de-parted.
>

How funny! :D

Christine

> --
> Dr. David Campbell
> 425 Scientific Collections
> University of Alabama
> "I think of my happy condition, surrounded by acres
> of clams"
>

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Received on Fri Aug 24 13:06:01 2007

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