[asa] NASA Administrator Michael Griffin Not Sure That Global Warming Is A Problem

From: Janice Matchett <janmatch@earthlink.net>
Date: Thu May 31 2007 - 23:29:03 EDT

Hee hee hee. ~ Janice

He's not buying the Gore"bull" warming meme, and
probably thinks someone at NASA needs a
counterbalance James Hansen's impolitic and unscientific ravings.

I learned to my consternation last night that
NASA is considered by many to be primarily an
"environmental" organization. I worked briefly
for Jim Fletcher, the Administrator who
apparently created that emphasis. Read this pdf
file and weep:
<http://cepa.maxwell.syr.edu/papers/77/lambright-2006-09a.pdf>Science
in a Political Context

41 posted on 05/31/2007 1:19:13 PM EDT by Bernard Marx
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1842310/posts?page=41#41

Dr. Griffin holds seven degrees, and is pursuing
his eighth. In chronological order of attainment,
Dr. Griffin’s degrees include:

BS Physics (The Johns Hopkins University, 1971)
MS Aerospace Science (The Catholic University of America, 1974)
PhD Aerospace Engineering (University of Maryland, College Park, 1977)
MEng Electrical Engineering (University of Southern California, 1979)
MS Applied Physics (The Johns Hopkins University, 1983)
MBA Master of Business Administration (Loyola College in Maryland)
MEng Civil Engineering (The George Washington University, 1998)

25 posted on 05/31/2007 11:31:53 AM EDT by Perdogg
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1842310/posts?page=25#25

NASA Administrator Michael Griffin Not Sure That Global Warming Is A Problem
National Public Radio ^ | May 30, 2007 | NPR
Posted on 05/31/2007 1:31:13 AM EDT by Names Ash Housewares
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1842310/posts

May 30, 2007; Washington, DC - NASA Administrator
Michael Griffin tells NPR News that while he has
no doubt "a trend of global warming exists, I am
not sure that it is fair to say that it is a problem we must wrestle with."

In an interview with Steve Inskeep airing
tomorrow on NPR News' Morning Edition,
Administrator Griffin says "I guess I would ask
which human beings - where and when - are to be
accorded the privilege of deciding that this
particular climate that we have right here today,
right now is the best climate for all other human
beings. I think that's a rather arrogant position for people to take."

Transcribed excerpts of the interview are below.
All excerpts must be credited to NPR News'
Morning Edition. The interview airs tomorrow
morning, Thursday, May 31. Local station's air
time of the program is available at
<http://www.npr.org/stations>www.npr.org/stations.
Audio of the interview will be available at
<http://www.npr.org>www.npr.org. Television usage
must include on-screen credit with NPR logo.

STEVE INSKEEP: One thing that's been mentioned
that NASA is perhaps not spending as much money
as it could on is studying climate change, global
warming, from space. Are you concerned about global warming?

MICHAEL GRIFFIN: I am aware that global warming
-- I'm aware that global warming exists. I
understand that the bulk of scientific evidence
accumulated supports the claim that we've had
about a one degree centigrade rise in temperature
over the last century to within an accuracy of 20
percent. I'm also aware of recent findings that
appear to have nailed down -- pretty well nailed
down the conclusion that much of that is manmade.
Whether that is a long term concern or not, I can't say.

MR. INSKEEP : And I just wanted to make sure that
I'm clear. Do you have any doubt that this is a
problem that mankind has to wrestle with?

MR. GRIFFIN: I have no doubt that global -- that
a trend of global warming exists. I am not sure
that it is fair to say that it is a problem we
must wrestle with. To assume that it is a problem
is to assume that the state of earth's climate
today is the optimal climate, the best climate
that we could have or ever have had and that we
need to take steps to make sure that it doesn't
change. First of all, I don't think it's within
the power of human beings to assure that the
climate does not change, as millions of years of
history have shown, and second of all, I guess I
would ask which human beings - where and when -
are to be accorded the privilege of deciding that
this particular climate that we have right here
today, right now is the best climate for all
other human beings. I think that's a rather
arrogant position for people to take.

MR. INSKEEP : Is that thinking that informs you
as you put together the budget? That something is
happening, that it's worth studying, but you're
not sure that you want to be battling it as an army might battle an enemy.

MR. GRIFFIN: Nowhere in NASA's authorization,
which of course governs what we do, is there
anything at all telling us that we should take
actions to affect climate change in either one
way or another. We study global climate change,
that is in our authorization, we think we do it
rather well. I'm proud of that, but NASA is not
an agency chartered to quote "battle climate change."

Leah Yoon NPR Senior Manager, Media
Relations http://www.earthtoday.net/news/viewpr.html?pid=22729

*
"The scientists believe research on issues like
climate change will suffer as NASA shifts
priorities toward exploration missions to the
moon and Mars. "Earth has always been central to NASA's science," Hansen said.

There's the central problem. NASA is the
"National Aeronautics and Space Administration".
Studying the earth is a byproduct of space
flight, used as an excuse to get projects funded.

Hansen should go to work at the EPA with the
other greenies where he belongs. Leave NASA to those with the Right Stuff.

38 posted on 05/31/2007 1:26:05 PM EDT by narby
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1842538/posts?page=38#38

NASA's Top Official __Questions Global
Warming__ [Janice interjects: That's a BALD-FACED LIE by the weasels at ABC]
ABC News ^ | May 31, 2007 | CLAYTON SANDELL and BILL BLAKEMORE
Posted on 05/31/2007 11:51:11 AM EDT by Kaslin
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1842538/posts

NASA Administrator Michael Griffin Questions Need to Combat Warming

NASA administrator Michael Griffin is drawing the
ire of his agency's preeminent climate scientists
after apparently downplaying the need to combat global warming.

In an interview broadcast this morning on
National Public Radio's "Morning Edition"
program, Griffin was asked by NPR's Steve Inskeep
whether he is concerned about global warming.

"I have no doubt that a trend of global warming
exists," Griffin told Inskeep. "I am not sure
that it is fair to say that it is a problem we must wrestle with."

"To assume that it is a problem is to assume that
the state of Earth's climate today is the optimal
climate, the best climate that we could have or
ever have had and that we need to take steps to
make sure that it doesn't change," Griffin said.
"I guess I would ask which human beings where
and when are to be accorded the privilege of
deciding that this particular climate that we
have right here today, right now is the best
climate for all other human beings. I think
that's a rather arrogant position for people to take."

Griffin's comments immediately drew stunned
reaction from James Hansen, NASA's top climate
scientist at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York.

"It's an incredibly arrogant and ignorant
statement," Hansen told ABC News. ..." [snip]

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Received on Thu May 31 23:30:09 2007

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