Re: [asa] flagella

From: David Opderbeck <dopderbeck@gmail.com>
Date: Tue May 22 2007 - 14:19:27 EDT

This is an interesting article, but I'm uncertain why it has such major
implications for the ID debate. The article suggests that the genes that
regulate the proteins in bacterial flagellar systems have a common core of
ancestral genes. Why does that, in itself, suggest that the system as a
whole arose through the gradual modification and cooption of mechanical
parts? I'm not seeing how showing that the *genes* have common precursors
solves the problem of the irreducible complexity of the particular
assemblage of mechanical components built from the proteins expressed by
those genes. I suspect someone like Behe would say "*yeah, I don't reject
common descent, so I'm not surprised that these genes derive from a common
source; my point isn't about the lineage of the underlying genes, it's about
the unique assemblage of the components built from the proteins expressed by
those genes*." Or maybe my lack of facility with this literature is
clouding the significance of this paper for me?

On 5/22/07, D. F. Siemens, Jr. <dfsiemensjr@juno.com> wrote:
>
> /Science/, 316:799 (11 May 2007) has a summary of an article in /Proc.
> Natl. Sci. U.S.A./, 104:7116 (2007) on the evolution of the genes
> involved in the bacterial flagella. "I can't imagine ..." again fails.
> Dave
>
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Received on Tue May 22 14:19:58 2007

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