Re: [asa] Cobb County settles lawsuit

From: PvM <pvm.pandas@gmail.com>
Date: Wed Dec 20 2006 - 12:48:22 EST

On 12/20/06, James Mahaffy <mahaffy@dordt.edu> wrote:
>
> > First Kitzmiller and the incessant whining about how
> > irrelevant the ruling really was, and then
> > the elections and now Cobb County settling the lawsuit.
> > One may wonder how (ir)relevant the ruling really was.
>
>
> I don't care what you wonder. I do care about the broader issue of
> whether or not public education should claim that it is
> neutral and the beliefs of the teachers and the community CAN NOT be
> part of the education. I would content to make the strong separation
> and put some academic areas in the neutral camp is to teach a
> secularism.
>
> Now that is an issue I would like see us discuss on its merits.

Public education is never neutral, especially when it comes to
science. As far as the beliefs of the teachers, these have no place
within public education. If the community or the family holds special
beliefs then they are free to provide ways to teach these. Public
education however is no place to teach religious faith.

Public education has to remain religiously neutral or at least
agnostic. As long as one realizes that neutral does not mean that
public education has to be hostile to religious faith.

Wikipedia

----Begin----
Secularism has two distinct meanings.

   1. It asserts the freedom of religion, and freedom from religion,
within a state that is neutral on matters of belief, and gives no
state privileges or subsidies to religions.
   2. It refers to a belief that human activities and decisions should
be based on evidence and fact, and not beliefs which secularists
consider superstitious, however devoutly held, and that policy should
be free from religious domination. For example, a society deciding
whether to promote condom use might consider the issues of disease
prevention, family planning, and women's rights. A secularist would
argue that such issues are relevant to public policy-making, whereas
Biblical interpretation or church doctrine should not be considered
and are irrelevant.
-----end ------

I see 1 as an acceptable secularism while the second one may be too
restrictive. Nevertheless, what is wrong with secularism?

To unsubscribe, send a message to majordomo@calvin.edu with
"unsubscribe asa" (no quotes) as the body of the message.
Received on Wed Dec 20 12:49:07 2006

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.1.8 : Wed Dec 20 2006 - 12:49:07 EST