Re: [asa] Christian Evolution?

From: D. F. Siemens, Jr. <dfsiemensjr@juno.com>
Date: Tue Dec 12 2006 - 13:09:47 EST

Greg,
If you are using "evolution" in its early sense, fetal development, the
answer is yes. C. S. Lewis describes his development from atheist to very
unhappy theist, and then to enjoyment of faith. However, if you are using
the contemporary sense, the answer is clearly a no. Individuals do not
evolve organically; it's larger groups. Further, Christianity is not a
matter of genetic change. But, if you are thinking of social evolution,
then Christianity has evolved into full orthodoxy and a host of heresies.

If one becomes more technical, there are additional senses of the term
that can be distinguished. But you seem to have taken a scrambled eggs
approach to the distinctions in contrast to your earlier desire to
distinguish various applications of the term.
Dave

On Mon, 11 Dec 2006 18:58:12 -0500 (EST) Gregory Arago
<gregoryarago@yahoo.ca> writes:
Please excuse if I am about to ask what might seem to be an especially
uncomfortable question, but the thought came to me: if you can’t ask this
question on-line at the ASA then where can you ask it? If anyone offering
an answer would prefer to send a personal e-mail in reply, then feel free
to do so.
 
Is it possible for a human being to ‘evolve’ into being a Christian? If
so, are they more complex or simple (as a person) when they become a
Christian than they were before?
 
Hopefully this question will be treated with care, accepting that faith
and love are also the basis for our human life, including the vocations
that we select (are selected for us), the particular sciences and
scholarly fields in which we are working.
 
G. Arago

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Received on Tue Dec 12 13:16:53 2006

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