Fwd: mtDNA Eve and the determination of humanity

From: David Opderbeck <dopderbeck@gmail.com>
Date: Wed Feb 22 2006 - 11:59:21 EST

Glenn, I'm curious about the Neanderthal Cave Bear cult idea. My
understanding, which I admit is not even up to the novice level, is
that the idea of a Neanderthal Cave Bear Cult is not widely accepted
(see e.g. http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/~latta/A01/Week8b.html,
http://rechten.eldoc.ub.rug.nl/FILES/departments/Algemeen/DennenJMGvander/NEANDER/NEANDER.pdf).

This seems to me to represent part of the problem with archaic
hominids. It seems that there simply isn't enough data to make any
definitive conclusions about what they were, which means that any
attempt to relate them to the Biblical narratives is only speculation.
  Incidentally, as an ASA member, I'm intensely interested in the
questions raised by archaic hominids as well as the history of H.
Erectus, and I agree with you that they raise difficult questions
concerning the Biblical narratives. Like many other difficult
questions, it seems like an "I
don't-know-here-are-some-possibilities-I'll-have-to-wait-and-see" kind
of thing just now.

On 2/22/06, glennmorton@entouch.net <glennmorton@entouch.net> wrote:
>
>
>
> One recent discussion of Adam ceased at the point where I asked a question, which was: Why does the fact that some woman didn't leave her mtDNA in modern offspring imply that she was not a human?????
>
> I have never figured out why everyone gets so excited because only one woman left her mtDNA in all modern humans. My mother only left her mtDNA in 3 people on earth. Does that mean she is only a near human?
>
> In a more recent thread, I stated that modern concepts which have Adam as a neolithic farmer ignores the data of anthropology which indicates that there was religious activity much longer ago than the neolithic farmer, and among archaic hominids, who lived prior to anatomically modern humans. (Bruniquel, Bilzingsleben, Tan-Tan, Berekhat Ram, Drachenloch, Regourdou etc) The bandwidth went as silent upon these questions as it does when one asks a YEC to explain why there are footprints throughout the geologic column.
>
> Why did Neanderthals go 1/4 mile into a dark cave, build a square structure of some sort and burn a bear? Seems like it would be easier to barbeque the fellow on the surface in the light. Religious reasons seem likely. Why do we find primitive femal idols from Tan-Tan Morocco, dated 400,000 years ago and from Berekhat Ram in Israel, from at least 235,000 years ago and call these things the actions of non-humans?
>
> Are the ASA members even interested in upholding the findings of modern sciences like anthropology, or are they, like the YECs, eager to avoid them or relegate obvious human activity to mere animal-creature-humans? I actually think the general ASA member is as eager to avoid such questions as YECs are eager to avoid issues of geology because such issues strike at the heart of the accepted apologetic.
>
> Yeah, these are provocative questions and I know I am a Ba*s***d, (or more politely a dog who won't let go of a bone) but
>
> 1. I don't care,
> 2. it really shouldn't matter to the determination of the truth, and
> 3. I think asking questions is what we actually need to do.
>
> Questions like the above. Indeed, I would ask why others don't ask similar questions to those which I ask. Are we questionaphobic like the YECs? Are we so stuck on our explanations that we can't see that logic is not with them?
>
> And I would like to ask why we cease asking tough questions of our own positions when we don't do that in our professions?
>
>
>
Received on Wed Feb 22 12:00:28 2006

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