Re: Believe it even if it isn't true theology

From: George Murphy <gmurphy@raex.com>
Date: Sun Feb 19 2006 - 15:07:00 EST

I was resisting the temptation to get into this topic again with Glenn until I saw this from him. I am one who has given the example of the Good Samaritan in discussions with him & he always avoids the issue - although by saying that people "try this one" he makes it sound like some kind of trick that he's seen through. The point is that the story doesn't need to be historical narrative in order that express the truth that Jesus uses it for. Sure, this could be an account of something that really happened but but there's not a shred of evidence that it was.

In fact, most of Glenn's claims for historicty are of this "it could have been," or "it might have been" nature - usually removed som far into the past that it's impossible to check. We can't verify that the story of Noah really happened with the Mediterranean flood ~5 MYr ago but it "might" have. We can't - & probably never will be able to - verify his stillborn apelike creature story but that's OK - it "could have been."

Shalom
George
http://web.raex.com/~gmurphy/
  ----- Original Message -----
  From: glennmorton@entouch.net
  To: asa@calvin.edu
  Sent: Sunday, February 19, 2006 8:36 AM
  Subject: Re: Believe it even if it isn't true theology

  Melvin wrote:
>Glenn, Do you think the *parable* of the good Samaritan teaches any
>truth? Or is Jesus only permitted to use non-fiction to make his point?

  I have had lots of people try this one. Melvin, what in particular about this story makes it untrue or incapable of being untrue? What evidence do you have that this is a fiction? Perhaps this actually happened and was news in Jerusalem during Jesus' time.

>
Received on Sun Feb 19 15:08:22 2006

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