Re: Surprising diversity in bacteria genomes

From: Pim van Meurs <pimvanmeurs@yahoo.com>
Date: Fri Sep 23 2005 - 21:16:39 EDT

Once again I fail to see how Hunter reached this conclusion. In fact
homology was still quite strong but what was found is that bacteria
evolve quickly and in fact can acquire genetics via horizontal transfer.
I fail to see why this diversity of cousin species is a problem for
evolution, but perhaps Cornelius can elaborate further.
It may be helpful if Hunter can support his assertions and claims about
what evolutionists were thinking with some additional references.
So far, once again, I see little reason why this should be considered
'another problem for evolution'. So I am looking forward to any
clarifying remarks.

Funny that we spoke about eye evolution just the other day and guess
what, science has progressed significantly once again in understanding
the evolutionary aspects of the eye

http://www.scienceagogo.com/news/20050822230316data_trunc_sys.shtml

Insight Into Eye Evolution Deals Blow To Intelligent Design

How complex and physiologically remarkable structures such as the human
eye could evolve has long been a question that has puzzled biologists.
But in research reported this week in Current Biology, the evolutionary
history of a critical eye protein has revealed a previously unrecognized
link between certain components of sophisticated vertebrate eyes - like
those found in humans - and those of the primitive light-sensing systems
of invertebrates. The findings, from researchers at the University of
Oxford, the University of London and Radboud University in The
Netherlands, put in place a conceptual framework for understanding how
the vertebrate eye, as we know it, has emerged over evolutionary time.

The research report can be found at Current Biology, Vol. 15, pages
1684-1689, September 20, 2005. DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2005.08.046

See also http://www.medilexicon.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=31008

"The evolution of complex and physiologically remarkable structures such
as the vertebrate eye has long been a focus of intrigue and theorizing
by biologists. In work reported this week in Current Biology, the
evolutionary history of a critical eye protein has revealed a previously
unrecognized relationship between certain components of vertebrate eyes
and those of the more primitive light-sensing systems of invertebrates.
The findings help clarify our conceptual framework for understanding how
the vertebrate eye, as we know it, has emerged over evolutionary time."

Cornelius Hunter wrote:

> Folks:
>
> Another problem for evolution that the new genome data are presenting
> is the high diversity of cousin species. Evolution predicts a high
> degree of homology between genomes of cousin species. Evolutionists
> were surprised to find that, instead, similar species consistently
> have their own, unique genes. Initially evolutionists thought that
> homologies for these unique genes would soon be found after a few more
> similar species were sequenced. But instead, they just continued to
> yield new, unique genes. Now they are finally dropping the prediction
> altogether. A new paper out of TIGR discusses the genome of
> a Streptococcus species, and concludes there will be no closure on
> homologies. It is summarized in the piece below.
>
> --Cornelius
> ---------------------------------------------
>
>
>
Received on Fri Sep 23 21:19:26 2005

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