Re: Teaching Evolution - Childs Perspective

From: Sarah Berel-Harrop <sec@hal-pc.org>
Date: Thu Sep 15 2005 - 12:36:00 EDT

Somehow I am reminded of the Dawkins person whose first
post on the newsgroup talk.origins (a decidedly anti-
Dawkins crowd) said, "Isn't Gould too religious to be
objective about evolution?" basically. The ensuing furor
was a wonder to behold, and actually resulted in some
quite useful and interesting material.

Gould has written a number of articles about the dangers
of scientism, as has his friend Richard Lewontin. I don't
think it's in any way fair to lump him with Sagan and
Dawkins. Perhaps Alan means Daniel Dennett, a most obnoxious
promoter of philosophical naturalism?

On Thu, 15 Sep 2005 09:48:53 -0600
  "Terry M. Gray" <grayt@lamar.colostate.edu> wrote:
> Alan,
>
> I'm quite surprised that you lump Gould and Dawkins together. I
>never counted Gould as a believer, but I never counted him in any
>way as an advocate of scientism.
>
> TG
>
> On Sep 15, 2005, at 6:03 AM, Mccarrick, Alan D CIV NSWCCD
> Philadelphia, 9212 wrote:
>
>> Keith,
>>
>> I would 99% agree with your statement that the story abuses both
>> the Christian doctrine of creation and the ideas of evolution.
>>
>> However, there are those self proclaimed spokesmen for scientism
>> like Sagan, Gould, and Dawkins to name but few who loudly proclaim
>> (ed) just the connection you reject: science (and evolutionary
>> biology in particular) demonstrate that there is no God at all, and
>>
>> we "brights" are the ones you should listen to. Their voices are
>> loud and are they hold themselves up as the spokesmen for the world
>>
>> of science. I certainly understand how someone can think that
>> science equals or leads to atheism after reading Dawkins.
>>
>> Believers who also happen to be in the scientific community have
>> the enormous job of trying to educate our brothers and sisters who
>> don't have much of a background in science, who never met a
>> Christian in science and listen to the loudest voices in the
>> evangelical community.
>>
>> For example, the first evening at the ASA conference, my wife an I
>> were talking with some girls in the dinner line about why we were
>> there and what they were doing. They were there for a youth
>> leadership conference. When we explained what our conference was
>> about, she commented to my wife something like, "Oh, that's
>> interesting, I didn't know that Christians could be scientists too!"
>>
>> (Keith, It was great to meet you and Ruth at Messiah. Your
>> presentation in the Panel was quite powerful - I wish each of you
>> had more time.)
>>
>> Al McCarrick
>>
>>
>> Keith wrote:
>>
>> The above is symptomatic of, and reinforces, popular false views of
>>
>> both evolutionary science and science education. The above does
>> not have the slightest relationship to evolution -- the only
>> connection is the utterly false view that evolution is atheistic.
>> Therefore to teach evolution is to teach atheism. Secondly it
>> implies that public science educators seek to teach atheism.
>> Another utterly false view. Any public school teacher would
>> rightfully be insulted by the above.
>>
>> Keith
>>
>
> ________________
> Terry M. Gray, Ph.D.
> Computer Support Scientist
> Chemistry Department
> Colorado State University
>Fort Collins, CO 80523
> (o) 970-491-7003 (f) 970-491-1801
>
>
Received on Thu Sep 15 12:53:44 2005

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