Re: Is evolution really the central theory for all of biology?

From: Pim van Meurs <pimvanmeurs@yahoo.com>
Date: Wed Sep 14 2005 - 12:17:47 EDT

Joel Moore wrote:

>
>
>>By: Philip S. Skell
>>The Scientist
>>August 29, 2005
>>
>>--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>Darwin's theory of evolution offers a sweeping explanation of the history
>>of life, from the earliest microscopic organisms billions of years ago to
>>all the plants and animals around us today. Much of the evidence that
>>might have established the theory on an unshakable empirical foundation,
>>however, remains lost in the distant past. For instance, Darwin hoped we
>>would discover transitional precursors to the animal forms that appear
>>abruptly in the Cambrian strata. Since then we have found many ancient
>>fossils - even exquisitely preserved soft-bodied creatures - but none are
>>credible ancestors to the Cambrian animals.
>>
>>
>
>While others can speak the topic more expertly than myself, I think
>Dr. Skell is wrong where he says no credible ancestor exist for
>Cambrian organisms.
>
>
I find the fascination of ID with the cambrian explosion quite
interesting. Not only does it extend over a period similar or longer to
the time of divergence for humans but additional data more and more
helps explain the Cambrian. ID proponents quote extensively from the
earlier works of Valentine but often forget to mention Valentine's opus
On the Origin of Phyla (2004) in which he introduces the reader to his work

"The title of this book, modeled on that of the greatest biological work
ever written, is in homage to the greatest biologist who has ever lived.
Darwin himself puzzled over but could not cover the ground that is
reviewed here, simply because the relevant fossils, genes, and their
molecules, end even the body plans of many of the phyla, were quite
unknown in his day. Nevertheless, the evidence from these many
additional souces of data simply confirm that Darwin was correct in his
conclusions that all living things have descended from a commmon
anscestor and can be placed within a tree of life, and that the
principle process guiding their descent has been natural selection."

(Valentine On the Origin of Phyla 2004: Preface)
Received on Wed Sep 14 12:18:48 2005

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