RE: The Curse - Upon All Creation or Just Mankind?

From: John Stahl <jwstahl@geneva.edu>
Date: Wed Sep 29 2004 - 14:02:32 EDT

I mostly lurk on this list, and have not followed all of the comments on
this thread. However, Mike's comment touches on a thought that I have
had for some time.

If we apply the literary framework view to Genesis 1, as first put
forth by Meredith Kline and widely discussed over the past 30 years,
should we not carefully consider what the signficance might be of the
seventh day. What is the writer indicating in Gen. 2:1,2: "Thus the
heavens and the earth were completed in all of their vast array. By the
seventh day, God had finished the work he had been doing, so on the
seventh day he rested from all his work."

One interpretation could be that God's creative activity ceased (or
changed in some fundamental way) after the creation of humans.

Since this is not a crucial point in my understanding of scripture, I
am willing to let the data indicate if new species are currently
arising. Many people seem to think that there are, although our data is
such an eyeblink in geological time, that I find these claims to be
somewhat unimpressive. Ted's question about star formation is also
interesting. However, since we use the term "birth of a star," this
could easily be understood to be a reshaping of matter/energy that is
comparable to reproduction in living creatures. However, life out of
non-life seems to me to be a line in the sand that Gen. 2:1 rules out.

John

Dr. John W. Stahl
Department of Chemistry
Geneva College
Beaver Falls, PA 15010
(724) 847-6705
jwstahl@geneva.edu

>>> "Ted Davis" <TDavis@messiah.edu> 09/29/04 11:59AM >>>
>>> "Mike Tharp" <mtharp@exammaster.com> 09/29/04 11:07AM >>>writes:
I'm not sure that "thorn-associated insects (mimics, etc.)" or the
thorny
plants themselves would necessarily "have to be part of an extra round
of
creation." The evolution of species is a well-documented and widely
accepted fact. I can't imagine there's anyone who would argue that
"new
species can't be forming after the end of Genesis 1."

Ted asks:
How about new stars? Can there be actual star formation now, in the
Milky
Way or elsewhere?
Received on Wed Sep 29 14:30:38 2004

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