RE: The Curse - Upon All Creation or Just Mankind?

From: Roger G. Olson <rogero@saintjoe.edu>
Date: Mon Sep 27 2004 - 20:50:57 EDT

Mike,

What's your definition of "perfection"? After you answer that, please
answer what you think God's definition of "perfection" is.

In God's Peace,

Roger

> Hello Gordon,
>
> I don't believe that Genesis 2:5 is referring to desert areas in which
> plants could not survive. Verse 6 continues by saying, "But there went up
> a
> mist from the earth, and watered the whole face of the ground."
>
> I concede, however, that it could certainly be possible that "conditions
> were very different outside the Garden than they were in it both before
> and
> after the Fall" and that "thorns and thistles could have been present
> outside the Garden before the Fall". However, call me stubborn, but I
> would
> still disagree that death and suffering occurred before the Fall, even
> outside the Garden of Eden.
>
> Your comment regarding "very good, not perfect" got me to thinking. (I
> know; scary concept!) Wouldn't God, in His perfection, have created
> perfection originally? In other words, wouldn't the original creation
> have
> been perfect until God cursed it because of man's disobedience?
>
> In Christ,
> Mike
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: gordon brown [mailto:gbrown@euclid.Colorado.EDU]
> Sent: Tuesday, September 21, 2004 12:00 PM
> To: Mike Tharp
> Cc: 'AmericanScientificAffiliation'
> Subject: Re: The Curse - Upon All Creation or Just Mankind?
>
>
>
> Before the creation of man it is said that the creation was good rather
> than very good. After the creation of man it is said to be very good, not
> perfect. (The law of the Lord is perfect.) What God has created is still
> said to be good even now (I Tim. 4:4). Prophecies in Revelation and
> elsewhere indicate that something better is possible.
>
> We note that the good creation before the Fall contained desert (Gen.
> 2:5), due to conditions in which plants could not survive. Adam was told
> that he would surely die the day he ate from the forbidden tree. What
> would that have meant to him if he had never seen a dead animal? What was
> the significance of the tree of life? See Gen. 3:22. Indications are that
> conditions were very different outside the Garden than they were in it
> both before and after the Fall. Thorns and thistles could have been
> present outside the Garden before the Fall.
>
> Gordon Brown
> Department of Mathematics
> University of Colorado
> Boulder, Colorado 80309-0395
>
>
>
>

-- 
Received on Mon Sep 27 21:31:40 2004

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