RE: The Curse - Upon All Creation or Just Mankind?

From: Mike Tharp <mtharp@exammaster.com>
Date: Mon Sep 27 2004 - 20:02:58 EDT

Hello Gordon,

I don't believe that Genesis 2:5 is referring to desert areas in which
plants could not survive. Verse 6 continues by saying, "But there went up a
mist from the earth, and watered the whole face of the ground."

I concede, however, that it could certainly be possible that "conditions
were very different outside the Garden than they were in it both before and
after the Fall" and that "thorns and thistles could have been present
outside the Garden before the Fall". However, call me stubborn, but I would
still disagree that death and suffering occurred before the Fall, even
outside the Garden of Eden.

Your comment regarding "very good, not perfect" got me to thinking. (I
know; scary concept!) Wouldn't God, in His perfection, have created
perfection originally? In other words, wouldn't the original creation have
been perfect until God cursed it because of man's disobedience?

In Christ,
Mike

-----Original Message-----
From: gordon brown [mailto:gbrown@euclid.Colorado.EDU]
Sent: Tuesday, September 21, 2004 12:00 PM
To: Mike Tharp
Cc: 'AmericanScientificAffiliation'
Subject: Re: The Curse - Upon All Creation or Just Mankind?

Before the creation of man it is said that the creation was good rather
than very good. After the creation of man it is said to be very good, not
perfect. (The law of the Lord is perfect.) What God has created is still
said to be good even now (I Tim. 4:4). Prophecies in Revelation and
elsewhere indicate that something better is possible.

We note that the good creation before the Fall contained desert (Gen.
2:5), due to conditions in which plants could not survive. Adam was told
that he would surely die the day he ate from the forbidden tree. What
would that have meant to him if he had never seen a dead animal? What was
the significance of the tree of life? See Gen. 3:22. Indications are that
conditions were very different outside the Garden than they were in it
both before and after the Fall. Thorns and thistles could have been
present outside the Garden before the Fall.

Gordon Brown
Department of Mathematics
University of Colorado
Boulder, Colorado 80309-0395
Received on Mon Sep 27 20:19:07 2004

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