Re: Science and Theology

From: William Hamilton <whamilton51@comcast.net>
Date: Tue May 04 2004 - 20:13:21 EDT

I wrote:
>>
>>>> Might it not be that God's primary interaction with the world is in
>>>> his
>>
>> dealings with mankind? >>

Burgy wrote
>>
>> That is the idea that makes the most sense to me. I know His
>> interactions
>> with me; to a lessor extant those with my wife. Interactions with the
>> inanimate world (wine at Cana and such), except for the days 200
>> years
>> ago, seem to be rarities.
>
David Campbell wrote

This is somewhat ambiguous. Dealings with mankind are, as far as we
know, His primary interaction in the sense of value (e.g., sparrows are
of concern, but lesser value, and much less costly to purchase).
However, the continuous role of sustaining creation could be termed an
"interaction". I think extraordinary interactions are the main focus
of the prior posts.
George wrote

> Bill & Burgy -
> Is this really what you want to say - that God only rarely
> "interacts" with the world beyond the human race? Do you mean
> "intervenes"?
> With whatever model of divine action one uses, other than a
> "clockmaker"
> one, God is "interacting" with the whole world &/or all parts of it
> all the
> time. "Intervention," in the sense that God directly "breaks into" the
> usual course of natural processes, would be one form of interaction
> but by
> no means the only one. I would agree that there is no reason to think
> that
> in that sense God intervenes beyond the scope of humanity - & rarely
> then.

David has a good point -- sustaining creation could be considered an
interaction. Perhaps "intervention" is a better term. Some years ago I
proposed (probably on talk.origins, but possibly here as well) that
nature could be considered a mechanism capable of responding to God's
commands(Howard develops a notion similar to this in some of his
writings) . In our observation of nature we see law-like behavior --
something like observing a computer at the gate level but cannot
directly observe the interaction between God and nature. In human
affairs, however, God has demonstrated his desire to interact on a
conscious, communicative level with humans.
Bill Hamilton Rochester, MI 248 652 4148
Received on Tue May 4 20:14:02 2004

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