Re: Making Tracks

From: Bill Payne <bpayne15@juno.com>
Date: Fri Apr 02 2004 - 00:50:10 EST

Hi Steve,

I want to compliment you. Over the years you have always maintained a
cordial spirit towards those of us (mainly me) with whom you disagree,
and this post of yours is no exception. I accept your apology - sort of
:-)

I was wondering where these wandering herds of dinosaurs got enough food
to eat, which is one of the questions raised in the current ICR Impact
article at: http://www.icr.org/pubs/imp/imp-370.htm You say that the
tracks are found in sandstone, which I assume was once thousands of
square miles of wet sand (I doubt dry sand would preserve footprints,
would it?) with no visible evidence of swamp trees for the dinos to munch
on. Or am I missing something here? Is this another example of trees
with no roots? :-) What did these beasts eat? The Impact article says
"A large herbivore like Apatosaurus would need to eat more than a ton of
green fodder each day in order to survive." Were the Cretaceous dinos
carnivores? Maybe they got fat enough on the floating mat to fan out
over the Dakota before they drowned.

I'm sure you'll have a good answer and I'll end up looking dumb again,
but hey, I'm getting used to it. At least I'm learning a lot and gaining
a little humility in the process, so I guess dumb is a small price to
pay, considering the benefits!

Kevin my friend, I promise haven't forgotten your "Unanswered Questions"
post. I've been thinking about it, taken a few photos of swamps and
grass/tree roots, and run a little experiment re Stokes law, but have
been very busy. I'll try to answer within a week.

Bill

On Mon, 29 Mar 2004 09:34:11 -0700 "Steven M Smith" <smsmith@usgs.gov>
writes:
> Here are a couple items about some recent finds of dinosaur tracks.

[snip]
Received on Fri Apr 2 00:52:41 2004

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