Re: Canadian Coal - depositional setting

From: Kevin Sharman <ksharman@pris.bc.ca>
Date: Sun Jan 25 2004 - 21:49:59 EST

----- Original Message -----
From: "Glenn Morton" <glennmorton@entouch.net>
To: "Kevin Sharman" <ksharman@pris.bc.ca>; "Bill Payne" <bpayne15@juno.com>
Cc: <asa@calvin.edu>
Sent: Friday, January 23, 2004 5:36 PM
Subject: RE: Canadian Coal - depositional setting

>
> The problem with having the animals ride the veggie mats is that the
> Pennsylvanian coal mats had an entirely different set of animals than the
> Permian mats, which had an entirely different set of animals from the
> Triassic mats which had an entirely different set of animals from the
> Jurassic veggie mats and which had an entirely different set of animals
from
> the Cretaceous veggie mats.
>
> Bill, can you possibly explain why not a single veggie mat with Cretaceous
> animals grounded during the Pennsylvanian? or one with Pennsylvanian
animals
> grounded during the Cretaceous? What prevented them from running into
> shallow water?
>
> Another question Bill. Why wouldn't one single veggie mat float out to
the
> deep ocean and even if it didn't form a massive coal seam, why didn't one
> single veggie mat floating in the turbulent waters of the flood fall apart
> dumping their animals into the drink to be fossilized in deep water? In
> your model the Deep Sea Drilling Project should have found some dead land
> animals in the cores they have taken all over the earth.
>
> It seems almost incomprehensible to me that someone could really believe
> this stuff.

Funny you should mention this, Glenn. In October 2003 Dr. Emil Silvestru
was invited to my hometown of Tumbler Ridge, BC by local church groups. He
is the "world authority on the geology of caves" from Answers in Genesis,
whose "areas of expertise include: Sedimentology of clastic deposits,
stratigraphy of limestone terranes, general geology." (quotes from AiG
website). I had a 3 hour geology conversation with him. Our town is
becoming widely known for recently discovered dinosaur tracks and bones. I
asked him to explain how dinosaur tracks could end up in the Cretaceous
sediments here. He advanced the "hopped off the floating mat" idea that you
just shredded.

I'm happy to report that our meeting didn't end in fisticuffs (must be that
Canadian politeness), but let's just say we had few points of agreement.

Kevin
Received on Sun Jan 25 21:50:39 2004

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