Re: Do non-U.S. Christians say "God Bless America?"

From: Michael Roberts (michael.andrea.r@ukonline.co.uk)
Date: Wed May 28 2003 - 17:21:20 EDT

  • Next message: Jay Willingham: "Re: Do non-U.S. Christians say "God Bless America?""

    The other day I looked at a God and Country website from a fundi baptist
    church in Wisconsin and regretted not pinching a sickbag last time I flew
    with United Airlines. It had it all references to the John Birch Society ,
    the gun lobby (to give Americans the right to be shot particularly
    schoolkids), Creationism and all the rest of it.

    Were I an untravelled Brit I would have dismissed American as gun-toting
    arrogant hypocrites.

    Fortunately I know many who abhor this kind of dangerous drivel (some on
    this list) including Wheaton students who were sickened by American jingoism
    at a rodeo in SD on 3 July 2001and found it hilarious to have me with them.

    There is a big difference between patriotism and nationalism. The former is
    love of country realising its faults (1000 pages on the faults of the USA
    and the UK) and the latter is to say my country right or wrong and think
    that all its victories are God's. If you look at the history of any nation
    you will find some awful things which cannot be God's victories.

    Michael.
    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Jay Willingham" <jaywillingham@cfl.rr.com>
    To: "ASA" <asa@calvin.edu>
    Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2003 4:10 PM
    Subject: Do non-U.S. Christians say "God Bless America?"

    > > A prayer for one's nation or whomever one may choose is not idolatry; it
    > is
    > > a prayer.
    > >
    > > America is a nation of folks who believe in and worship the God of the
    > Bible
    > > and attend formal worship services to a greater degree than most, if not
    > > all, other nations. That is a sad fact.
    > >
    > > Frankly, I do not believe how we are perceived by the rest of the world
    > > should be used to modify our behavior. Rather we should seek to know
    how
    > we
    > > are seen by God. The victories America has enjoyed since its inception
    > are
    > > God's. They do not spring from our own inherent goodness or ability,
    but
    > > from God's gracious protection. The warhorse is prepared for battle but
    > the
    > > victory is the Lord's. If we do not humble ourselves before him we will
    > > lose.
    > >
    > > Jay Willingham
    > >
    > >
    > > ----- Original Message -----
    > > From: "Joel Cannon" <jcannon@jcannon.washjeff.edu>
    > > To: <asa@calvin.edu>
    > > Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2003 10:14 AM
    > > Subject: Do non-U.S. Christians say "God Bless America?"
    > >
    > >
    > > > I am curious what non-U.S. citizens think of statements like this,
    > > > which implicitly tie the gospel to "God Bless America."
    > > >
    > > > I find it to be a surprisingly clear manifestation of the national
    > > > idolatry that characterizes too much of American (U.S.)
    > > > Christianity. Why not just say "God is on our side" or "America is
    > > > God's country" and be done with it?
    > > >
    > > > There are many things for an American citizen to be thankful for
    > > > (much of which can be traced, ironically, to the Enlightenment). My
    > > > post is not anti-American. However, the line between the good and the
    > > > bad (or the Godly and the un-Godly) cuts right down the middle. Being
    > > > Christian should encompass among other things telling the truth about
    > > > the principalities and powers of this age; we are citizens of a
    > > > different kingdom. Our belief that "Jesus is Lord" should mean that we
    > > > do not worship America, the American ideal, or other things "of this
    > > > world."
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Forwarded message:
    > > > > From asa-owner@lists.calvin.edu Mon May 26 13:56:26 2003
    > > > > Message-ID: <000701c323ac$a40f0260$6401a8c0@cfl.rr.com>
    > > > > From: "Jay Willingham" <jaywillingham@cfl.rr.com>
    > > > >
    > > > > Save this one and most important thing,
    > > > >
    > > > > God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten son, that
    those
    > > who
    > > > > believe in him should not perish but have everlasting life.
    > > > >
    > > > > Remember those who have laid down their life for our freedom.
    > > > >
    > > > > God bless America.
    > > > >
    > > > > Jay Willingham, Esquire
    > > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > > ----
    > > > Joel W. Cannon | (724)223-6146
    > > > Physics Department | jcannon@washjeff.edu
    > > > Washington and Jefferson College |
    > > > Washington, PA 15301 |
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
    >
    >
    >



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