Re: The Flood Hoax

From: Jay Willingham (jaywillingham@cfl.rr.com)
Date: Thu Sep 19 2002 - 20:03:41 EDT

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    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "george murphy" <gmurphy@raex.com>

      The reason for such assessment is that there are features
    > of the story that indicate in various ways that it is fiction. I take the
    > liberty to repeat this list from an earlier post of mine.
    >
    > The well-known site of the city of Nineveh was not "three days
    > journey in breadth" (3:3).

    ----George: My NIV says "a visit required three days" in Jonah 3:3. Jay

    > "The king of Nineveh" is a title equivalent to "The president of
    > Washington." The king who might have been resident in Nineveh would have
    > been "the king of Assyria."

    ----- George, I always thought that figure of speach could also mean the
    king of Assyria. Jay

    > There is no historical evidence for a mass conversion of the whole
    city of Nineveh in the time of historical prophet Jonah (II Kg.14:25), some
    time around 765 B.C.

    -----George, our best historical source for the period documentarily
    speaking is the canon of scripture. By Jonah's day, knowledge of God would
    have been widespread, so when a miraculously appearing prophet of God's said
    "You're toast", they figured correctly this God was to be reconed with. Jay

    > The prayer of Jonah in Chapter 2 makes no reference to his being
    "in the belly of the fish" but seems to be that of a man threatened with
    drowning (2:5).

    -----

    Exactly, George, a man saved from drowning by a fish. Jay

    > There are obvious exaggerations. I already mentioned the size of
    > Nineveh. Jonah's "sermon" in 3:4 is 5 words in Hebrew - enough to satisfy
    > the minimum conditions of his commission but hardly enough to convert the
    > whole city.

    -----George, if a fish just puked a man on the beach and that man told you
    were about to be annihilated, you would probably start praying for some
    relief, too. Jay.

    >
      This is manifestly false. The point of Lk.12:16-21 is not lost if
    > the events in it didn't actually take place.
    > (& of course many other parables of Jesus could be mentioned. I note this
    one
    > because God appears in it directly rather than via some representation
    like the
    > father in the story of the prodigal son.)

    -----George, Jesus expressly posed his stories and parables as such. Jonah
    and Job are named as are many others in their stories. Jay
    >
    .
    >
      The force of this question ought not be blunted by trying to find other
    messages in the story.

    ------Amen, George. Petty geneologies can draw us aside from the Savior's
    imprimatur to forgive others as we are forgiven,,, Jay
    >



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