Demarcation

From: John W Burgeson (burgytwo@juno.com)
Date: Thu Dec 27 2001 - 13:34:08 EST

  • Next message: george murphy: "Re: God acting in creation #4+++"

    Moorad wrote that "If something cannot, in principle, be measured by
    physical devices, then that something is outside the purview of science.
    This gives a clear demarcation of what science is and what it is not."

    Plantinga writes, in the ARN journal recently, about "the
    demarcationists," those who define "science" to their own individual
    tastes, and remarks that this is OK as it tightly defines something but
    is less than useful in understanding it. He suggests, rather, that
    "science is what scientists do" is a vastly more useful definition. Which
    got me to thinking (bad idea, some will say).

    Suppose the New Age movement (whatever it might be) sweeps over all
    civilization so that even scientists find themselves, regularly, both as
    individuals and in group situations, deliberately positing and allowing
    for the supernatural in their experiments and theories. Crystal and
    pyramid studies are now part of every respectable physics curriculum.
    Etc. Etc.

    In this gedanken and tragic world, Plantinga would, I guess, still argue
    that what scientists are doing is "science." I don't think I'd agree. I
    think Moorad and I would be on the same page here. But it still comes
    down to definitions, and one does not want to be known as a
    "demarcationist. I think.

    John Burgeson (Burgy)

    http://www.burgy.50megs.com
           (science/theology, quantum mechanics, baseball, ethics,
            humor, cars, God's intervention into natural causation, etc.)



    This archive was generated by hypermail 2b29 : Thu Dec 27 2001 - 16:54:11 EST