Re: God acting in creation #4+++

From: Walter Hicks (wallyshoes@mindspring.com)
Date: Mon Dec 17 2001 - 23:01:43 EST

  • Next message: george murphy: "Re: God acting in creation #4+++"

    It seems as though we always implicitly assume that God made only one thing our universe --- and that He acts only within that context. Yet we know that more exists than just what we see.

    Using an analogy, if we wished to create robots artificial intelligence --- we would certainly take more than one path.

    In one situation for example, I see no reason to a-priori assume that Adam and Eve and the Garden of Eden were part of the space-time continuum that we see now. Moreover, if God were to change the laws of the universe at some point, it could involve all of space-time -- not just from some space-time event and then forward in time.

    Walt

    bivalve wrote:

    > > Like the other physicists here, I simply don't see how the possibility for new types of organization to be introduced without there being corresponding changes in the properties of matter and its interactions, and thus in the laws that describe the physical world - whether those laws deal with particles or fields, or are classical or quantum.<
    >
    > I would take Peter's model of God selecting an extremely improbable outcome to produce a novel structure as an example of introducing a new type of organization without a change in the laws of physics. Similarly, creating some entity ex nihilo (e.g., the first cell) and then letting it carry on under ordinary providence would not require an alteration of the laws of physics, though they would be set aside in the creation event itself.
    >
    > Dr. David Campbell
    > Old Seashells
    > 46860 Hilton Dr #1113
    > Lexington Park MD 20653 USA
    > bivalve@mail.davidson.alumlink.com
    >
    > That is Uncle Joe, taken in the masonic regalia of a Grand Exalted Periwinkle of the Mystic Order of Whelks-P.G. Wodehouse, Romance at Droigate Spa

    --
    ===================================
    Walt Hicks <wallyshoes@mindspring.com>
    

    In any consistent theory, there must exist true but not provable statements. (Godel's Theorem)

    You can only find the truth with logic If you have already found the truth without it. (G.K. Chesterton) ===================================



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