God and time

Clarke (wclarke@pnc.com.au)
Fri, 21 Nov 97 10:27:37 +1100



I would like to suggest a more theological approach to both the God and time discussion. I suggest the solution to these problems is to be found in the nature of God
Perhaps I had better introduce myself first. I am an Australian, I have degrees in science both geology and zoology (genetics), education and theology (Christian apologetics) and a Diploma in Religious Education. I have been thinking about the evolution/creation problem for about fifty years. I am retired now but for many years I was in charge of Science in the teacher education section of a College of Advanced Education. I have a few papers published in the Journal of Christian Education (Australia) and the Faith and Thought (UK)

The traditional Christian view expressed in the creed, “I believe in one God the Father Almighty, maker of heaven and earth, and of all things visible and invisible”, is Scripturally based and reasonable. The problem lies in a failure to see the implications of the creed.
If God created “all things visible and invisible” then He designed and created not only matter-energy but also time and space together with all the properties of these created things including the so called ‘Laws of Science’ and all natural mechanisms. Furthermore, God can not consist of anything that He created, neither can He be limited by them. He is independent of both time and space. He is omnipresent in both space and time. There is no question as to how God can know the future because past, present and future are all the same to a God independent of His own creation of time. Likewise the Scripture teaches God to be changeless. This is reasonable since change is related to time and God is not limited by His own creation.
If one considers the size and age of the universe it is obvious that a creator limited by either time or space could not be in control of it. In considering the creation one must never forget the omnipresent nature of God.

We should have no physical picture of God the Father. As Moses reminded the Hebrews: “ And Jehovah spake unto you out of the midst of the fire: ye heard the voice of words, but ye saw no form; only ye heard a voice.” (Deuteronomy 4:12, ASV).

Our minds find it difficult to relate to a God “without parts. ” but, “the Word became flesh, and dwelt among us (and we beheld his glory, glory as of the only begotten from the Father), full of grace and truth.” (John 1:14, ASV), so although “ No man hath seen God at any time; the only begotten Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, he hath declared him. (John 1:18, ASV). While the Father has no physical form we can have a reliable concept of His nature as it is revealed in Christ Jesus our Lord who is, in the words of Charles Wesley:
Our God contracted to a span,
Incomprehensibly made man.

W. Grainge Clarke